BRAZIL'S PRESIDENT TESTS POSITIVE FOR CORONAVIRUS

RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) — Brazil’s President Jair Bolsonaro has tested positive for the new coronavirus after months of downplaying its severity while deaths mounted rapidly inside the country.

The 65-year-old right-wing populist who has been known to mingle in crowds without covering his face confirmed the results yesterday while wearing a mask and speaking to reporters huddled close in front of him in the capital, Brasilia.

He said he is taking hydroxychloroquine, the anti-malaria drug he, like President Donald Trump, has been promoting even though it has not been proven effective against COVID-19.

Bolsonaro told reporters, “I’m, well, normal. I even want to take a walk around here, but I can’t due to medical recommendations.”

Brazil, the world’s sixth-biggest nation, with more than 210 million people, is one of the outbreak’s most lethal hot spots. More than 65,000 Brazilians have died from COVID-19, and over 1.5 million have been infected.

Both numbers are the world’s second-highest totals, behind those of the U.S., though the true figures are believed to be higher because of a lack of widespread testing. On Tuesday alone, 1,254 deaths were confirmed.

Other world leaders who have had bouts with COVID-19 include British Prime Minister Boris Johnson, Britain’s Prince Charles, Prince Albert II of Monaco and Honduran President Juan Orlando Hernández.

TEXAS REACHES MILESTONE IN CORONAVIRUS CASES

AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — Texas surpassed 10,000 new coronavirus cases in a single day yesterday for the first time, crossing a sobering milestone rarely seen since the pandemic first hit the U.S. in March.

The record high of 10,028 new cases in Texas served as another alarming new measure of the swift resurgence of COVID-19 nationwide and the failures of the country’s response. Republican Gov. Greg Abbott began one of America’s fastest re-openings in May but has begun reversing course in recent weeks, ordering bars closed and requiring face coverings.

New York and Florida are the only other states to record more than 10,000 new cases in a single day. New York hit that total in April, when New York City hospitals were overwhelmed and hundreds of people were dying every day. Florida topped 10,000 confirmed cases last week.

PPG SUPPLIES RUNNING LOW

UNDATED (AP) — The personal protective gear that was in dangerously short supply during the early weeks of the coronavirus crisis in the U.S. is running low again as the virus resumes its rapid spread and the number of hospitalized patients climbs.

A national nursing union is concerned that gear has to be reused. A doctors association warns that physicians’ offices are closed because they can't get masks and other supplies. And Democratic members of Congress are pushing the Trump administration to devise a national strategy to acquire and distribute gear in anticipation of the crisis worsening into the fall.

When the crisis first exploded in March and April in hot spots such as New York City, the situation was so desperate that nurses turned plastic garbage bags into protective gowns. The lack of equipment forced states and hospitals to compete against each other, the federal government and other countries in desperate, expensive bidding wars.

In general, supplies of protective gear are more robust now, and many states and major hospital chains say they are in better shape. But medical professionals and some lawmakers have cast doubt on those improvements as shortages begin to reappear.

WNBA OWNER QUESTIONS LEAGUE'S SOCIAL JUSTICE PLANS

NEW YORK (AP) — Atlanta Dream co-owner Kelly Loeffler is not in favor of the WNBA’s social justice plans and has sent a letter to Commissioner Cathy Engelbert objecting to the league’s initiatives to honor the Black Lives Matter movement.

Loeffler, who is also a Republican U.S. senator running for re-election in Georgia, asked the league commissioner to scrap plans for players to wear warm-up jerseys with “Black Lives Matter” and “Say Her Name” — and instead put an American flag on uniforms and apparel.

“The truth is, we need less - not more politics in sports. In a time when polarizing politics is as divisive as ever, sports has the power to be a unifying antidote,” wrote Loeffler. “And now more than ever, we should be united in our goal to remove politics from sports.”

In the letter, Loeffler, a Dream owner since 2011, said she wasn’t consulted about the league’s new social justice policy.

Engelbert issued a statement in response to Loeffler in a statement. “The WNBA is based on the principle of equal and fair treatment of all people and we, along with the teams and players, will continue to use our platforms to vigorously advocate for social justice,” the commissioner said.

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA GETS ITS FIRST BLACK LEADER EVER

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Dr. Michael Drake has been chosen to be president of the University of California, the first Black leader in the system’s 150-year history.

Drake, a seasoned university administrator, replaces Janet Napolitano in overseeing a sprawling, 280,000-student system dealing with issues of accessibility four Blacks and other minorities, along with slashed budgets and upended campus life because of the coronavirus pandemic.

Drake is a UC-trained physician who served as chancellor of the University of California, Irvine, and also led The Ohio State University before retiring from that job last month.

The UC Board of Regents unanimously approved Drake’s appointment.

“I’m excited and ready to go,” Drake told the board, noting the challenging times amid the pandemic, the threat of climate change, and “the yawning wounds of social injustice that we see in so many ways that really tears at the fabric of our lives.”

He noted that the UC system is “best equipped worldwide” to be “fully engaged in finding solutions.”

WORLD'S LONGEST-SURVIVING COJOINED TWINS DIE

UNDATED (AP) — A custom casket is being built for the funeral of the world’s longest-surviving conjoined twins, who died July 4 in Ohio of natural causes.

Donnie and Ronnie Galyon, who were born joined at the abdomen, claimed the world record in 2014 shortly before they turned 63.

Their younger brother Jim Galyon said he’s received an outpouring of support following their deaths. “They made 68, and they couldn’t ask for anything more,” he said.

A funeral with family and friends is set for next week to allow time to build a casket large enough for both of his brothers, Galyon said.

On Facebook, he said, people had written to him saying, “‘You gave your brothers a great life,’ and that meant the world to me.”

Starting as children, Donnie and Ronnie Galyon appeared at carnivals and on cruises as a sideshow attraction. Jim Galyon said that their income supported their family for years. They retired from entertaining in 1991.

In 2010, the twins’ health declined, and the Dayton community raised funds to help renovate Jim Galyon’s home to allow the brothers to move in and navigate in a custom wheelchair, the Dayton Daily News reported.