NAYA RIVERA SEARCH RESUMES

LOS ANGELES (AP) — The search continues today to try to recover the body of actress Naya Riivera. And authorities say not only is the search work difficult — it may also, in the end, be futile. The biggest enemy: the body of water where the “Glee” star is believed to have drowned. Authorities say Lake Piru is murky, making it difficult for divers to see more than a foot ahead of them. It also has a lot of vegetation. That poses a danger for divers trying to maneuver around as they search. One sheriff's sergeant says there's a possibility Rivera's body may have become entangled in something below the surface — and that could mean it “may never come back up.” Rivera, 33, disappeared Wednesday afternoon after renting a pontoon on Lake Piru in Ventura County, California. Her 4-year-old son was found on the boat alone after rental workers noticed it hadn't returned on time. The boy wasn't physically injured.

JOHNNY DEPP CONTINUES TESTIMONY IN LONDON LIBEL CASE

LONDON (AP) — It will be up to a London court to decide whether Johnny Depp physically abused his ex-wife Amber Heard — and whether his libel claim against a British tabloid is legit. But one thing is clear from testimony so far: they had a strange relationship. Each accuses the other of physical violence and emotional battery. Depp testified today that Heard's abuse claims turned him from “Cinderella to Quasimodo” in the public eye. Today's testimony by the actor gave a further idea of how bad things were. Depp said the couple's marriage broke down for good after an incident in which he claims that Amber Heard or one of her friends — defecated in the couple's bed. Depp says he “thought that was an oddly fitting end to the relationship.” The trial is expected to come to an end after two more weeks.

2 DISNEY FLORIDA PARKS REOPEN TOMORROW — UNDER NEW COVID-19 RULES

ORLANDO, Fla. (AP) — When Disney reopens two of its Central Florida resorts tomorrow, it will be clear to anyone approaching the gates that any magic of escaping the daily routine will be tempered by the fact that the world is experiencing a pandemic. For example, you can't just decide on a whim to visit the Magic Kingdom or Animal Kingdom; reservations are a must. You can't cozy up to the bigger-than-life Mickey Mouse- or Donald Duck- costumed employees — there are no meet-and-greet sessions. Fireworks and parades are a no-no — for fear they'd cause too many people to be in non-socially-distant quarters. And your selfie skills will have to be on point — because you won't be able to ask a Disney employee to take a photo for you. They won't — because they'd have to handle your camera, increasing the risk of possible exposure.

POLICE: POP SMOKE'S KILLERS LURED TO HIS PLACE BY ONLINE POSTS OF WEALTH

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Sad, but true — if you go around town flashing lots of cash and showing off expensive jewelry, you could make yourself the target of thieves. And police in Los Angeles say doing the same thing on social media led to a rapper's death earlier this year. When Pop Smoke was shot to death in February, it was unclear whether the killing was part of a home invasion. But now that authorities have looked into the case — and arrested five suspects in it — the theory held up. Authorities believe the 20-year-old up-and-coming rapper was killed his show-off his social media posts led five suspects to the upscale house he was renting. Some of the very images he posted gave away his location — including a photo of a gift bag bearing the address of the house he was renting.

DIXIE CHICKS NAME CHANGE WENT WELL

UNDATED (AP) — When Lady Antebellum changed its name to drop references that evoked memories of slavery, it went sideways because it turned out another performer had the same name — and now there's a lawsuit to resolve the dispute. The same thing could have happened when the Dixie Chicks dropped the “Dixie” from their name and go by The Chicks. They did their due diligence — and found there was another band called The Chicks in New Zealand — and they had been using the name for decades. The two parties made an agreement for both to continue using the same name.