CONCORD, N.H. (AP) — A New Hampshire House committee split evenly along party lines Tuesday on a proposal to prohibit most businesses from asking customers or employees whether they’ve been vaccinated against the coronavirus.

The committee on executive departments and administration voted 9-9 on amending a Senate-passed bill to add several vaccine-related provisions favored by Republicans. It reached the same outcome on a Democrat-backed amendment, meaning both versions will go to the full House next month with no committee recommendation.

Under the GOP-led amendment, businesses could not inquire about someone’s vaccine status or require employees to be vaccinated against the virus, with some exceptions for hospitals and long-term care facilities. It also would give the Legislature control over whether schools could require students to receive any future vaccines.

“If there’s one thing we’ve learned through this last year and a half it’s that having one person in charge of what we do, where we go and when we do it is not a good idea, and extending that to what we put in our children’s bodies is even worse,” said Rep. Terry Roy, the amendment’s sponsor.

As for businesses, he argued that allowing them to require or inquire about vaccinations would open the door to further intrusions, such as requiring workers to fall within a certain range for weight or body mass.

“If we allow businesses to decide what people have to do to their body to be employed or to be customers, we have to look at other things,” said Roy, R-Deerfield. “There’s no limit to what businesses could do to citizens who need a job, or a place to shop or to eat. We have to draw a line in the sand that people, their bodies, are autonomous.”

Democrats argued that public health officials, not lawmakers, should decide which vaccines should be required for school enrollment and that businesses should be allowed to make decisions based on public safety.

Rep. Peter Schmidt, D-Dover, said he got many emails from opponents of “vaccine passports,” but that isn’t on the table. And he pushed back on what he called a frequently expressed comparison between public health officials and Nazi Germany.

“For God’s sake, this is a respiratory disease. If there’s anything human beings need to do, it is to breath on a very, very frequent basis,” he said. “I believe that businesses have a right to protect themselves, their employees and the public.”

Under the GOP-led amendment, businesses could not inquire about someone’s vaccine status or require employees to be vaccinated against the virus, with some exceptions for hospitals and long-term care facilities. It also would give the Legislature control over whether schools could require students to receive any future vaccines.